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On this site you can also find information on the History of Institute for the Development of Dream Research, check out the Technology, find a list of Frequently Asked Questions and some Testimonials from participants in Virtual Dreaming studies in Australia. You can also check out the Dreamguides, a community organisation already working with the technology.


 Virtual Dreaming Research

The latest results in clinical research into Virtual Dreaming, based on studies of pain management, post traumatic stress disorder, and insomnia conducted in Australia and Norway, are about to be published in a new book. The book, published by the Australian Association of Applied Psychophysiology Researchers, is called Virtual Dreaming . This book describes the impressive results of clinical studies done on Virtual Dreaming technology and its many applications. The book is written and edited by an international group of experts in the field of psychophysiology.

Virtual Dreaming is related to Lucid Dreaming. In Lucid Dreaming the dreamer is aware they are dreaming and manages to remain asleep. Often in these situations the dreamer has remarkable control of the environment and course of events within their dreams, and this is also the goal in virtual dreaming.

The concept of lucid dreaming is not a new one and there have been numerous attempts to induce the state with various rates of success. The problem lies largely with the consistency of the methods. Dr. Stephen LaBerge developed an approach that he labelled mnemonic induction of lucid dreams, or MILD. He maintains that by recognizing a dream one is dreaming, one can attain control over it. LaBerge combined this with a number of supplements designed to boost Acetylcholine levels to increase the likelihood of lucid dreaming.

Researchers following LaBerge, including Thomas Yuschak, further refined this method and cited the need for balancing the levels of other hormones and neurotransmitters, including Serotonin, Dopamine and Norepinephrine. Yuschak’s book, published in 2006, gained widespread popularity amongst people seeking to enhance their dreams for recreational or self-help purposes, as it went into detail on how to combine supplements with other techniques to enhance the vividness and overall recall of dreams. 

In 2001, following the founding of IDDR by McNaughton, our own research enters the equation. Electrical stimulation of the brain does indeed induce a dreamlike state. Our continued research led us to discover that as the entire human body can act as a conductor of electricity, and the stimulation can be done wirelessly. The current travels up the body and arrives at the brain as one signal amongst many.

Consider the human sense of touch for example, a very similar process and one that is in fact factored into our technology. You reach out to touch something, feel the shape and the texture. How are you doing this? Through the sensory neurons, or nerves, in the tips of your fingers that then transmit electrical impulses back to your brain which then informs you exactly what you are touching. Is it hot or cold? Soft? Sharp? Is the sensation pleasurable or should you in fact not be touching this? Our own electrical signal can in essence piggy-back along this very signal via a simple touch-pad all the way to the brain.

With the completion of the first three clinical studies in Australia, interest in Virtual Dreaming as a new treatment for a range of neurological disorders has grown rapidly. The studies to date indicate a strong remedial effect for virtual dreaming in areas such as pain management, stress disorders and insomnia.

 

On this site you can also find information on the History of Institute for the Development of Dream Research, check out the Technology, find a list of Frequently Asked Questions and some Testimonials from participants in Virtual Dreaming studies in Australia. You can also check out the Dreamguides, a community organisation already working with the technology.

 

Home Research History Technology Testimonials FAQ

This page last updated 24th November 2008

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